The Observatory on Canada-Latin America Relations (OCLAR) is an eye on Canada and Latin America, with a special focus on mining, migration, and foreign relations.

Observatorio de las relaciones de Canadá y América Latina (OLCAR) es una mirada a las relaciones de Canadá con América Latina, con un enfoque en temas de minería, migración, y relations exteriores.

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Today, the British Columbia Court of Appeals in Vancouver, Canada will revisit a procedural motion in the case of seven Guatemalans who have brought a civil suit for battery and negligence against Tahoe Resources. The suit concerns the mining company’s role in a violent attack in April 2013, when Tahoe’s private security opened fire on peaceful protesters outside the controversial Escobal silver mine in southeastern Guatemala. Video footage shows that the protestors were shot at close range while attempting to flee.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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By PETER MAZEREEUW
PUBLISHED : Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 12:00 AM
The Liberal government is “seriously reviewing” the creation of an ombudsperson to investigate Canadian companies implicated in wrongdoing abroad, says Canada’s corporate social responsibility counsellor for the extractive sector, Jeffrey Davidson.
After a year of getting its feet wet and dealing with top priorities, the government has turned its attention to Mr. Davidson’s office and the corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies of the previous Conservative government, he said in an interview with The Hill Times last week.
“[They’re] working through how they want to deal with this whole issue: the CSR issue, the conduct of Canadian companies overseas, not just in the extractives, but across sectors, and what they should do…above and beyond what exists,” he said.
NY Times
MONTREAL — “Canada is back,” says Justin Trudeau, the charismatic and bilingual prime minister of Canada, at international gatherings, seeking to showcase the imprint he wants to put on Canadian foreign policy in contrast to that of his predecessor, Stephen Harper. The prime minister has used very precise terms in his speeches: justice, environmental care, democracy and human rights. He even dared to invoke some of them during his official visit to China in September, although the Chinese did not applaud him for it.

Nov 11 2016 Voces
 

The liberal values of free trade and multiculturalism might be in retreat in the United States after the election of Donald Trump, but they are alive and well in Canada. A year after taking office, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will visit Cuba and Argentina beginning on November 15, before attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Lima, Peru. This trip is an opportunity for Canada to increase its standing in Latin America, and for Trudeau to promote the principles and interests of his country –the world’s 10th largest economy– in the hemisphere.

By Jean Symes, The Hill Times, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016
The Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability has just released proposed legislation that would accomplish just that.
At least 44 people killed. More than 400 people injured. Hundreds more repressed and criminalized for defending their land, their health, and their livelihoods.
These figures are not from a war, although often it feels that way to those whose lives are being described.
Rather, these shocking details of human rights abuses were all connected with the activities of Canadian mining companies, throughout 13 countries in Latin America. And they represent barely the “tip of the iceberg.”
This according to The “Canada Brand,” a report released last week by the Justice and Corporate Accountability Project out of York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School.